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						DryBasements.com Ltd.

						Southwestern Ontario's crack repaie specialists since 1990

					Our Business is Basements,
  Our Foundation is People!®
Our Business is Basements, Our Foundation is People!

Select Foundation Type
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Poured Concrete

  • Description

    Poured Concrete

    A poured concrete wall is generally a single slab of concrete made from pouring a premixed mixture of cement, gravel, sand and water. This mixture has traditionally been poured between two forms that are held together by ties. These ties are used as spacers to keep the form constrained to a specific width.

  • Brief History

    Poured Concrete History

    The word concrete comes from the Latin word "concretus" which means compact or condensed. Concrete in its earliest forms was used in ancient Egypt, Babylon and Assyria and extensively in the Roman Empire. Scientists at MIT are studying if the concrete may have been used in the making blocks for the pyramids. Modern concrete had its start when in 1756, British engineer, John Smeaton made the first modern concrete (hydraulic cement) by adding pebbles as a coarse aggregate and mixing powered brick into the cement. Burnt lime was introduced in 1824 and was called Portland Cement. Recipes varied between individual contractors and the quality of the resulting pours varied as well.

  • Problems

    Poured Concrete Problems

    Leaks in poured concrete foundations can be as simple as a tie leaking, or can be as complex as plugged weeping tile.

    Our Poured Concrete Solution page will direct you to many of the problems associate with these foundations as well as our proven solutions...more

  • Crack Stitching
  • Exterior Excavation

Concrete Block

  • Description

    Concrete Block

    A block foundation, is constructed by stacking and interlocking blocks of concrete. Mortar is used between the blocks to facilitate bonding, add strength and keep the weather out.

  • Brief History

    Concrete Block History

    With the invention of a new style of cement in 1824 called Portland, it would not be long before innovative people would begin making decorative blocks that were designed to look like stone. These first precast, concrete blocks were cast in wood frames, dried like brick and then laid like bricks with mortar. The first house constructed entirely with this new concept was in 1837on Staten Island, New York. Production was improving, prices were dropping and at the turn of the 20th century the first mechanized production of blocks began. Recipes varied and the quality of the resulting blocks varied as well.

  • Problems

    Concrete Block Problems

    Leaks in concrete block foundations generally are not as isolated as with poured concrete. The hollows inside a block allow water to travel from one area to another. Most repairs to block foundations will require a more complex solution.

    Our Concrete Block Solution page will direct you to many of the problems associate with these foundations as well as our proven solutions...more

  • Exterior Excavation

Stone Masonry

  • Description

    Stone Masonry

    A stone foundation can be made of field stone, or quarried stone. Field stone is just as it sounds, stones that were collected from the fields in the surrounding area. Quarried stone has been excavated and processed at a quarry. Quarried stones are usually squared stones such as granite or sandstone or naturally flat shale type pieces of limestone etc. Typically you will find the more expensive larger quarried decorative stone being used above grade on top of a field stone or smaller quarried stone foundation. Often you will find the corners to be much larger corner stones to add strength and stability to the foundation.

  • Brief History

    Stone Masonry History

    Building with stone has a history almost as long as man himself. The strength and general availability of stone mad it easy for man to use it as a building material. From early times man has use mortar between the stones to build structures that would endure so much longer than organic materials. Mortar is more elastic than concrete and will allow the expansion and contraction required by a large masonry wall without cracking.

  • Problems

    Stone Masonry Problems

    Stone foundations are generally very sound structures that will endure hundreds or perhaps thousands of years and likely leak just as long. Water generally does not cause damage to a stone foundation but frost is of course an issue that must be addressed. The main problems with leaking stone foundations is to the contents and the living space air quality.

    Our Stone Masonry Solution page will direct you to many of the problems associate with these foundations as well as our proven solutions...more

Preserved Wood

  • Description

    Preserved Wood

    Preserved wood foundations, also called permanent wood foundations are constructed with pressure treated wood framing and pressure treated plywood cladding. The cavity between the framing members is insulated and drywall is generally applied to inside surface. The floor can be constructed of preserved wood or concrete. This is the same pressure treating process that is used for decking and fences.

  • Brief History

    Preserve Wood History

    The early 1960's saw much research into the use of preserved wood for foundations was researched heavily, but it was not until the mid 1970's that the concept gained acceptance. In the 40 or so years since then, hundreds of thousands of houses have been built on preserved wood foundations.

  • Problems

    Preserve Wood Problems

    PWF's must have more than adequate drainage. In most cases they have just been tarred and wrapped with plastic. This has proven inadequate. Research performed by CMHC (Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation) included testing for airborne arsenic and fungi levels. The conclusions showed acceptable levels of arsenic but Wall cavity airborne fungi characteristics were highly variable. Frequently these tests indicated the presence of significant fungal contaminant sources.The visual condition of the exterior and interior surfaces of the foundation wall and reported history were not reliable indicators of he airborne fungi characteristics within the wall cavity.

    Our PWF Solution page will direct you to many of the problems associate with these foundations as well as our proven solutions....more

Brick

  • Description

    Brick

    A brick foundation generally consists of 3 parallel courses of brick with special interweaving courses call bonds keeping the wall together. Often the wall will sit on a footing of several courses of brick laid directly on the substrate somewhat wider than the foundation. This footing will often step narrower with each course.

  • Brief History

    Brick History

    The making of bricks for construction predates many written records. It is well documented that the Ancient Egyptians enslaved people such as the Israelites for making bricks used in building an empire. Early bricks were mud or clay baked in the sun. North American brick making dates to the early 1600's with the remains of a brick kiln from the 1630's being found in Colonial USA.

  • Problems

    Brick Problems

    Our Brick Solution page will direct you to many of the problems associate with these foundations as well as our proven solutions...more

Welcome

Welcome to DryBasements.com. We have tried to make our site informative and easy to navigate. We recommend that you begin with selecting your foundation type from the list above. You can request a Free Estimate at any time using the yellow banner on the right of the page






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We are gearing up fro the Spring Home Show season and look forward to seeing everyone at the St. Thomas Home and Garden Show next weekend. Held at the Timken Center, the show will be a great opportunity for everyone to come and discuss their problems … wet, leaky, basement problems anyway. We talk about [...]

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